Van der Pop

Miron Glass

April Pride

So, you ask, what exactly is Miron glass? Violet-colored, food-safe glass containers used for storage and created by a Swiss scientist after 14 years of research.  The use of violet-colored glass to preserve materials dates back to ancient Egypt, where it was used to store seeds, healing products and other essentials. Those same uses persist today  - storage of herbs, seeds and dried plant matter as well as live fruits and vegetables. It can also be used to store products for the pharmaceutical and beauty industries.

The super secret magic of Miron glass is its effect on water. Making it the perfect water bottle and is a favorite among bohemians and festival goers. The glass actually charges the water, making it more potent. Many believe that storing water in these violet glass bottles can increase the energy of the water - thus having energizing effects on people.

The color that differentiates Miron glass from its clear, amber or green counterparts offers benefits beyond beauty. Beyond beauty there’s science. Biophotonics to be specific. The word biophotonics comes from the greek words bios or life and phos, which means light. Biophotonics is an emerging area of scientific research that uses light and other forms of radiant energy to understand the effects light has on food and medicine. Scientists are researching the effects of light on organisms at the cellular level with regards to degradation.

Here are some examples of how light can affect tomatoes and chives as viewed on the Miron glass website:

As you can see, the type of glass can determine how quickly plant (read: bud, flower, weed, cannabis) materials will degrade.

Miron glass is essentially a light filter - violet light filter - that protects your stash from degrading rapidly. While the violet glass blocks out harmful UV rays, it allows non-harmful violet rays, non-visible UV-A rays and far-infrared light to penetrate, thus, nurturing the contents of the jar or bottle and slowing the decay process, which, in turn, protects contents from mold and bacteria growth. Put simply: Sunlight encourages plants to grow even after they are cut and dried. The Miron factor makes this simple statement a half-truth by highlighting the small yet crucial difference: The right sunlight encourages plants to mature not degrade. 

Imagine your favorite sunglasses. Now imagine the lenses are violet. My work is done here.

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